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Reading Diary for 2019
2019
2018
2017
2016
2015
2014
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2012
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  and earlier
"12.21"
by Dustin Thomason
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  • 21.12This was sitting on my nightstand, and I couldn't remember if I'd read it or not. By the time I realized I had, in fact, already read it, I was hooked anew. It's a taut little scientific thriller about the outbreak of a long-lost virus rediscovered in the Central American jungles and unleashed in Southern California, tied in to end-of-times cults using the Mayan calendar to predict doomsday. Nothing particularly original, and often reads as if it was written to be made into movie, but it's very well told with solid characters and plausible plotlines.

    "Cave of Bones"
    by Anne Hillerman
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  • Cave of BonesA bit of a letdown from the earlier entries Anne Hillerman had added to her father's Leaphorn & Chee mysteries. The dialogue is often wooden and clunky, and the plot developments aren't as sharp as her other entries. It's still nice to spend time again with these beloved characters on their beloved Navajo lands, but this outing felt a bit flat.

    "The Tale Teller"
    by Anne Hillerman
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  • The Tale TellerA wonderful return to form after the disappointing "Cave of Bones" (above). Retired Navajo Lt. Joe Leaphorn accepts a case in his new role as private investigator — an anonymous donation to the Navajo museum is missing an irreplaceable item from the shipping invoice. Meanwhile, Jim Chee and his wife, Bernie Manuelito, are working on a string of burglaries – until a murder victim is discovered along a running trail. Hillerman rediscovers her touch at dialogue – Leaphorn's passages could have come from one of her father's classic novels. Captain Largo casts a large shadow again, and even Cowboy Dashee makes a short cameo. All in all, one of Anne Hillerman's finest entries in a series begun by her father but capably carried forth by her.